Why Can’t We Support Farmers Like Israil

Why Can’t We Support Farmers Like Israil

To help the farmers, India and Israel are set to jointly develop the agricultural sector in India. Israil will share the harvest technologies as it has 10-years of  success in Agriculture Project.  Along with growing cherry tomatoes in Haryana, rejuvenating mango orchards in Maharashtra is high on the list.Demonstrating to Indian farmers the effectiveness of state-of-the-art irrigation technologies is the prime focus of the Israili mission.

Israel where 60% of the area is desert, exporting high-value farm produce like mangoes and avocados is a matter of pride. Whereas for India, among the largest food producers globally, the challenge is to counter the effects of erratic rainfall, raise productivity and use water efficiently.

Notable, some of the areas of Haryana, Nagpur, Maharashtra and Rajasthan and many other parts of India are hit by drought almost every year. Farmers suicide is very common in India, as we all know.

Water Crisis In Indian Agriculture Even After 70 Years Of Independence

Destitute farmers are committing suicide and tanks are running dry when scorching summer is at its peak. Last month, in a last-ditch effort to save lives, trains carried millions of litres of water to Latur, a parched district 400km east of Mumbai.

A good drenching will lift the spirits of both farmers and businesses. Over 600 million people in India depend on agriculture for their living.  And nearly two-thirds of land under cultivation has no irrigation and so relies on rain. The period between June to September brings three-quarters of total rainfall and is known to be erratic.

Farmers themselves will benefit from an Israeli water solution for their farming. Moreover it will be cost effective as well as less consumption of water. This can open up a whole new era of farming which automatically will influence the family earning of the farmers and our country.

Further, the plan is to establish a partnership on water conservation that includes waste-water treatment and its reuse for agriculture, desalination, water utility reforms, and the cleaning of the Ganga and other rivers using advanced water technologies.

The centre and state governments also need to push these technologies with more funding. Last year’s budget announced a Rs5,000 crore micro-irrigation fund, but it took almost a year to operationalise it.

The 10-year average for water levels is 38.5 per cent.

The Krishna river basin in peninsular India is particularly short of water, affecting Maharashtra, Karnataka, Telangana and Andhra Pradesh. The Indus, Tapi, Mahi, Cauvery and Godavari basins are also deficient basins, today’s data reveal, forecasting scarcity situations in the coming months in Maharashtra, Gujarat, Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu.

Farmers themselves will benefit from an Israeli water solution for their farming. Moreover it will be cost effective as well as less consumption of water. This can open up a whole new era of farming which automatically will influence the family earning of the farmers and our country.